Category Archives: Co. Antrim

Portballintrae

Last week we visited Portballintrae, a village right on the edge of the Atlantic Ocean, and close to the world-famous Giant’s Causeway, and the even more famous Bushmills Distillery.


This image was added on 1 November 2018:

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Portballintrae is very much a ‘dormitory’ village, now built up with modern apartments used a holiday home by people from elsewhere, which gives the visitor the impression that it is a soulless, sad place.  There is a small harbour, and a boat-club with a small clubhouse, and a decent beach, topped by an archeological treasure, the Lissnahall Prehistoric Earthworks.  A short drive leads to Bushmills, and I was intrigued by the bunting in the town square. Continue reading Portballintrae

Ballymartin, Co.Antrim

Ballymartin Road runs from the A57 Templepatrick Road to the Ballypalady Road, in Newtownabbey, and crosses the NIR trainline from Belfast to Antrim by way of a remote controlled level crossing.  It’s a single track line and trains cross the road every 30 minutes or so.  I first crossed it around 10 years ago, when I visited a bride’s home for photographs on her wedding day, but more recently a road closure forced me to travel along this minor road again.  I was reminded about the derelict building that sits at the side of the tracks, now covered in very professional looking graffitti.   It has chimneys and loos like it may once have been someone’s home – perhaps that of a railway worker?  At the time I made a mental note to pay it a visit again when next in the area.

I took the Fujifilm X-T2.  It was a cloudy enough October day and the light required an ISO around 800.  Here’s some of the images.

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F/16 @ 1/60th Sec on ISO800, focal length 16mm.

Continue reading Ballymartin, Co.Antrim

Antrim, Antrim…

Antrim is the county town of its eponymous county.  It’s Antrim, Antrim!  So good they named it twice!  22 miles from Belfast, Antrim lies along the banks of the ‘Six Mile Water’ and on the shores of Lough Neagh, the largest freshwater lake in the British Isles.

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The town’s history goes right back to just 30 years after the dewath of St Patrick, when, in 495, a Gaelic – speaking settlement of monks grew around the presnt site of the Antrim Round Tower. Continue reading Antrim, Antrim…

A Much Loved Dereliction?

There’s a derelict house on Sourhill Road, Ballymena, which presents the passer-by with some interesting contradictions.  The house is or rather was, a beautiful building, – almost an enigma, in its construction and decor, with beautiful colours, and fascinating roof patterns, and yet on even a casual inspection it is crumbling and decaying with broken slates and rotten timber.  It is unoccupied and abandoned, but sits in well kept extensive grounds, with mown grass and a well kept gravel path.  Its windows and doors have been removed and replaced with boards, but the boards have been painted to look like… windows and doors!

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This place is derelict, but someone still cares for it! Continue reading A Much Loved Dereliction?

St John’s Church, Donegore

I’ve often driven along the M2 between Antrim and Templepatrick, and wondered about the little church, nestling up in the trees above the moterway.  Today my curiosity got the better of me, and on the way home from a wedding I drove up to the church to get a closer look.  It’s St John’s Church of Ireland, and it sits amidst a churchyard with some very ancient graves and tombs.  Continue reading St John’s Church, Donegore

The Frocess

The Frocess Trees

The famous ‘Frosses Trees’ (original spelling ‘Frocess’) on the road between Ballymena and Ballymoney. The road runs through boggy ground,

Bogland-Up
Bogland near Glarryford, Co.Antrim

and the Pine trees were planted in 1840 on the instructions of Sir Charles Lanyon (architect and civil engineer) so that their roots would join under the road to provide support… Continue reading The Frocess