Tag Archives: Digital Photography

Fujifilm and iPhone – Syncretism.

Yes. I agree. It’s a totally uninteresting photograph. A picture captured by a camera, sitting on a newspaper in a cafe, looking at an empty chair. ‘So what?’ I hear you exclaim, as you conclude that I’ve finally lost the plot entirely.

So, why have I posted it? Because of how it was captured. The camera is switched on, untouched. On my iphone the Fujifilm app has connected by WiFi to the camera and is showing me the image being recorded on the sensor. I can adjust the camera settings, shutter, aperture, ISO etc etc.

Also, because the camera is mirrorless it can capture images silently. No noisy mirror to move out of the way. With the focus beep switched off, and the camera set to ‘Electronic shutter’ instead of the mechanical shutter, there is no sound as it does its work. (Ideal for church interiors incidentally).

So, to a casual onlooker, the photographer is simply sitting playing with his phone.

The camera is capturing the moment

Back to Basics #2 – Shutter Speed

Shutter Speed Facts

If the aperture controls the amount of light that falls on the camera sensor/film, the shutter determines how long that light falls on the film/sensor. Choosing the correct shutter speed is important because:-
* It can freeze a moving subject.
* It can blur moving subjects.
* It can help reduce camera shake.
So, how can we use the shutter speed to best advantage?

Continue reading Back to Basics #2 – Shutter Speed

Back to Basics #1 – Camera Aperture

BACK TO BASICS #1 – APERTURE

The aperture is the diaphram in your lens which controls the amount of light entering the camera. (The shutter controls the time that the light falls on the film/sensor) The diagramme attached to this post illustrates the effect of closing the aperture diaphram, and how it changes the light falling on the film/sensor. Continue reading Back to Basics #1 – Camera Aperture

Depth of Field on an iPhone?

How to get a Depth of Field effect on your Smartphone.

With the increase in iPhone photography (and of course there are other similar brands of smartphone) and with photographers starting to take iPhone photography seriously as an image medium, new apps to help the photographer improve there images are appearing all the time.

One of the real bug-bears with the iPhone camera is its lack of depth of field capability.  The small size of the lense and its proximity to the sensor makes optical depth of field impossible, (at least just now, who knows what lies ahead). So it was only a matter of time before an app appeared to produce a depth of field effect using digital manipulation in post-capture processing.  The app is AfterFocus, and it’s available now in the App Store for 79p. Continue reading Depth of Field on an iPhone?