Category Archives: Photo-Technique

The Lockdown Logs #56

The Lockdown Logs

Dateline: May 28th 2020

Coalport Figurine Chromakey

In the Pod today, playing with a small green screen set-up, to see how the light works best. I’ve set a small Coalport Lady Figurine on a table, with a green-screen background.  There’s a D-Lite just behind my right shoulder and natural light coming from the left of the figure.  The D-Lite is set low, not to be a key-light, but to simply reduce any shadow cast by the Coalport figure.

I’m using the Fujifilm X-T2, with a Nikon 50mm manual focus lens and the camera set for focus peaking.  F=50mm, f/5.6 @ 1/60th sec on ISO200.

Here’s the result:

Coalport-UP_

Here’s the set-up: Continue reading The Lockdown Logs #56

Ghosting Techniques

Last night I read an interesting post by Dee Tutor on LinkedIn about Ghosting Techniques, and I thought one or two of you readers might like to make it an interesting project for next week! All you need to do is nip over and read Daria’s blog, find an old and particularly interesting looking graveyard, (now that we’re allowed to visit graveyards again) and have a go!

Read D Tutor’s Blog Post HERE.

Try to shoot from the back of the headstones, – to avoid someone being offended that you’ve used their family grave in a photo.
Continue reading Ghosting Techniques

300mm Nikon Lens on Fujifilm X-T30

300mm Nikon Lens on Fujifilm X-T30

Here’s an experiment with an old manual focus 70-300mm zoom Nikon lens on the Fujifilm X-T30 mirrorless camera.

IMG_0074

I was given this lens as a gift in 1995, (I think) and although it’s slow (max f/4) it’s quite a good lens. The light was failing when this image was made, around 5.30pm, so the ISO was 6400, making the image grainy. I extended the lens to 300mm and shot a photo of this bush at f/4 – 1/250th sec.

I needed to keep the ISO high and shutter speed short to eliminate lens shake.  Overall though, I see possibilities for this combination.

Traffic Jams and Nikon Lenses!

Using a 35 year old Nikon Lens on a 1 year old Fujifilm Mirrorless Camera!

It’s rare to have open roads in Belfast on a Saturday, but today the roads were reasonably free of traffic – with people ‘self-isolating’ and ‘social distancing.’  But there was one traffic jam, and that was caused by the closure of an important route into and out of the city, the Sydenham By-Pass.  This closure caused a stand-still traffic jam on the lower section of the Newtownards Road (Ballymacarret) – Just one single snarl up in the whole city and I was stuck in it.

As it happened I had a camera right beside me on the passenger seat of the car, so while the car was stationery, with the handbrake on and the engine stopped, I made a small number of exposures.  Random images, of no relevance or importance.

DSCF4309 - Montage
Busy Belfast?  Because of the Coronavirus scare, the pubs, restaurants etc are closed, and the usually busy streets mostly deserted. This image processed to a sketch.

Continue reading Traffic Jams and Nikon Lenses!

That Dead Leaf Again…

So, day three of playing with a dead leaf.

(Even a cat wouldn’t play with a leaf as long as this). Today I set up the light tent, and put the leaf in it. I lit the tent with a Rotolight Neo, and used the Fujifilm X-T30. I had three objectives:
  1. To see the effect when I used the LensBaby lens,
  2. To create shadows by bringing the Rotolight down from the top of the tent tone side of the tent. (Left, so I could hold it by hand, and use the camera in my right hand)
  3. To mount the Rotolight on the camera hotshoe.

Continue reading That Dead Leaf Again…

Burning Waste for Heat

Following all the political controversy about the ‘Renewable Heat Incentive’ and the sudden proliferation of wood burners in deserted outhouses and barns, one bold company in the manufacturing industry has decided to recycle all its own waste wood shavings, by installing a furnace to provide the heat for their factory.  In the interests of investigative photo-journalism, I took a look into it, and here’s what I found…

Kiln

Continue reading Burning Waste for Heat

New Image File Format for iPhone

Apple Drops its Jpegs.

If you’ve been moving files from your iPhone to your PC recently, you’ll have noticed that Apple are no longer saving or storing files as ‘jpeg’ on the iPhone.  Instead the file extension reads ‘HEIC.’  It stands for ‘HIGH EFFICIENCY IMAGE CODING.’ and it came with the latest iPhone update.  It’s not new, and iPhone didnt even invent it, but incorporating it into the new iPhone image software is seen by Apple as the way forward for the future, after all jpegs have been around the internet for about 25 years.

Continue reading New Image File Format for iPhone

Artistic Perception in Photography #1

Artistic Perception in Photography 

A series of short articles practical exercises and notes for new and improving digital photographers. 

A friend posted a nice image in Facebook and remarked that it looked better when cropped. (That’s often the case!) It prompted me to ask the question, why?  Why was the cropped image more attractive than the original photograph. And that in turn prompted me to think and talk about photographic composition; about the elements of design and the way that our minds perceive visual imagery. 

So, in a series of these very short videos and lessons, we’ll go right back to basics, and find out how to compose images that will excite the imagination. Remember, rarely are good images made by accident, they are planned, well thought through, conceived and constructed in the mind even before the shutter is activated. 

This series of talks and notes will be an Introduction to Artistic Perception in Photography.   How to SEE creatively. 

-oOOo-

Part One: Zoom with Your FEET! Continue reading Artistic Perception in Photography #1

World Politics – In Belfast

Political graffiti in the university quarter of Belfast – and why you don’t always need humans to document human interest.

An interesting aspect of documentary photography is that human influence and interaction can be implied, rather than overt.

Even if people are not actually in the photo, the human element is still present and the human story is still told.

This gable wall in Belfast points us to events on the other side of the world, and indicates the desire of locals here to show solidarity with their fellow students there.  There is a significant Chinese community in South Belfast, many of whom are students at the university, and many of them would have Hong Kong origins.

Fujifilm X-T30 shot in Acros film simulation.

F=22mm, f/11 at 1/60th sec on ISO400.