Tag Archives: History

Ballygowan – The Time is Short!

Ballygowan Presbyterian Church Hall.

Bally 2

Originally known as ‘The Olivet Home’ it was built to be an orphanage in 1886 by Alexander Orr Reid as a memorial to his only son who was killed in a shooting accident. It was purchased by Ballygowan Presbyterian Church in 1918 and used as a school and church hall. The inscription on the building is ‘The Time is Short’ – thought to be a reference to the death of one of the construction workers, who fell to his death from the roof. A white stone on the top of the tower marks the event.

Hillsborough, Co.Down

Hillsborough is one of the trendy, affluent areas of Northern Ireland.  Situated on the A1 between Dromore and Lisburn, Hillsborough boasts a fine park with a lake, historic buildings, a fort, and even a Royal Residence (Hillsborough Castle).

I visited the town for a ‘walk with a camera’ one morning recently, when the sun was shining and it was around 24 degress celsius.  Here’s a few of the images…

Hillsborough Main Street.

Hillsborough_01 GA

Continue reading Hillsborough, Co.Down

Moira Railway Station

Moira, historically in the County of Down, is served by NIR (Northern Ireland Railways), via a station around 1 mile outside the town, and actually situated in Co Antrim.  The line is the Belfast to Portadown line, and Moira lies between Lisburn and Lurgan.

The station boasts a rather fine (although now disused) signal box and is the oldest station still in use on the NIR network, opened on 18 November 1841.  Its hard to believer now that just as recently as 1945 the station was manned by a staff of 15 men, including the stationmaster, porters, signalmen etc.  Now no-one works here at all.

 

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Continue reading Moira Railway Station

Upper Ballinderry – Co.Antrim

Q. What does a photographer do on his day off?
A. Photography.

With no studio appointments on a Friday, and lured by the prospect of a decent spring day, and with another matter to be attended to in the area, I travelled to Ballinderry. It’s a rural area in Co Antrim, between Moira and Crumlin.

To be more precise, my real destination was Upper Ballinderry –
(There was a yarn – about a Ballinderry man who wanted to travel home from Japan, and who went to a travel agent in a small remote Japanese town, and asked for travel to Ballinderry. With oriental inscrutability and precision the clerk replied, Yes sir. Upper or Lower Ballinderry?)

He’d find it hard to travel to Ballinderry by train now as my first stop in the village proved. NIR has mothballed the line between Lisburn and Antrim and Ballinderry Station is now a shadow of its former self. The Antrim bound platform has been dismantled and the station building allowed to decay. The entrance to the station is now blocked.  The track is still in place, – it was always a single track line, – but the passing loop has gone and the line seems to be used now as a siding. Today it had goods wagons sitting on the track.

Continue reading Upper Ballinderry – Co.Antrim

#Comber, Co.Down

A Walk in Comber…

Photography should never just be a profession or occupation.  It should be a passion – for when the photographer loses the passion for image-making, just for the sheer joy of making an image, it is time to put the camera on eBay.

There is great satisfaction in going to a town or village or landmark or area, and just making images for no other reason than to make images!  When I indulge my passion for photography, I like to use film, to shoot with my Nikon F100, and to shoot in Black and White.  I like to develop those images in chemicals myself, at home, at the kitchen sink, using methods I learned many years ago.

Last week, I took a walk through Comber, our nearest town, just 5 minutes  from Ballygowan, and shot a couple of rolls of film. Continue reading #Comber, Co.Down